Walking Through the #ETMOOC Browser

Here it is! My post about another new tool that I tried as part of the digital storytelling focus in #etmooc that I promised to share in my last post about flip books. After seeing someone else in the course suggest using Moquu, a free app that lets you make animated GIFs from your photos, I decided to test it out. Until recently, I had never created a GIF and my first ones were made from videos. So this time, I wanted to create a GIF from still images.

I heard many reports from the #etmooc community that GIMP (a free software that you can use to turn your images into GIFs) was pretty challenging to work with and since my time was limited, I decided I would try starting with a user-friendly app instead.

I found Moquu pretty easy to use, although I was confused for a bit about the difference between the app and “MultiMe” which is included in the getting started instructions but is actually a 0.99 cent add-on. The app has a fairly detailed introduction that you can always revisit by pressing the “i” icon. The instructions explain the different icons and app capabilities over a few screens although some things, like “onion skin” are not explained. I did find another neat animation site by looking it up though! The discoveries I make when I get stuck and go searching for solutions or new ideas is one of my favorite parts of learning with educational technologies.

Some advice I will offer after a few attempts at trying to make my GIF in Moquu:

  • The app hasn’t gotten the vertical video syndrome notice and doesn’t seem to record vertical GIFs well 
  • If you get an error message uploading/sharing, close the app and try again
  • There are 3 shooting modes: Single, Burst, Timelapse
  • You can re-order your photos on the editing screen and delete individual images

Once I figured out the basic tools, I moved on to making my GIF. After one of the scenes I saw in the #etmooc lip dub, I was inspired to create something using the #etmooc blog as my subject area. I also thought about this quote that has spoken to many of us involved in the course:

I decided I wanted to convey some part of that idea through my GIF, so I took shots of opening my laptop (door) onto the #ETMOOC homepage, the central node from which we have all been connected to this community and the place from which we have each gone out to create, connect, and share some more.

etmooc laptop

And although the laptop closes as the GIF loops, it always opens again. That’s kind of how I think of the #etmooc community. It lives in a space that’s primarily virtual and therefore it’s always open and waiting for me to ask questions, to engage and interact, to learn and share and to support me. This GIF tells the story of me opening or walking through my browser to enter the #etmooc community and join in on our shared thinking and learning. How do you visualize and tell the story of walking through the door and joining #etmooc?

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8 responses to “Walking Through the #ETMOOC Browser

  1. That’s excellent! I love the way you captured the quote through your laptop lid. Very nice metaphor!

  2. I like that analogy. (It’s also really neat for me to see your work space.) Thanks for sharing. :)

  3. Great image and thinking-through – and sharing. This is very much how I picture the #etmooc. I’ve had the door only open a crack this past week, as I’ve been working on reports, and am looking forward to falling once again down the rabbit hole. (once we get through the craziness of Shrove Tuesday/Ash Wednesday – can you say married to an Anglican priest?).

  4. onepercentyellow

    I love the GIF! I love the quote! But I love this too!!:

    “The discoveries I make when I get stuck and go searching for solutions or new ideas is one of my favorite parts of learning with educational technologies.”

    Self-directed learning at its best.

    • Yes! Having opportunities and time to explore and discover and then being able to connect with a community to share and discuss that learning is powerful. I hope all of my students can have those self-directed learning opportunities too.

  5. Pingback: Examining Open Education | Margaret A. Powers

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